Category: Birding

Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge serves primarily as a nesting, feeding, resting and staging area for migratory waterfowl. The varied habitats support approximately 266 species of birds – making it an excellent location for birders.

You can read our articles on birding below, or check out some of our birding tools like:
INWR Bird Finder – Trying to see a specific species? Pick a bird and see where other birders have sighted it!
INWR Birding Hotspots – See where on the refuge birders have been seeing the most birds.
INWR Bird Cam – During nesting season, we manage cameras in some of the nesting sites.

Michael Noonan and Gerry Rising

A New Website for Niagara Frontier Birders

Two regional birdwatchers, Mike Noonan and Gerry Rising, each of whom have had a long history with the Friends of Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge, have recently completed a series of...

The Warblers Are Arriving!

The Warblers Are Arriving!

Dear Supporters of the Friends of Iroquois, Inc.,  I am very disappointed that our joint Friends and Iroquois Refuge events have had to be cancelled due to the ongoing pandemic...

Birthday Birding Bash Field Trip

Birthday Birding Bash Field Trip

On the 117th National Wildlife Refuge System Birthday (3/14/2020), six birdwatchers took to the Iroquois NWR overlooks to search for migratory waterfowl. This occurred prior to the gathering restrictions implemented...

Oak Orchard Christmas Bird Count 2019

On December 27, 2019, 21 volunteers participated in the 52nd annual Oak Orchard Swamp Christmas Bird Count. The National Audubon Society, in collaboration with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service,...

Great Egrets gather at the Mohawk Pool – (photo by Celeste Morien)

Great Egret Excursion Program

This year’s Great Egret Excursion was held on the evening of September 7. Thirty people met at Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge at the Cayuga Pool Overlook for this exciting program....

Heron Nests

2018 Heron Nest Surveys

Did you know that herons nest in colonies that are called rookeries? Well, technically they are called heronries, but that term has never really caught on in the U.S. A...